Vegetables, vitamin D… This is how you get back in shape after the excesses of the holidays

Between alcohol, food, and long nights, graduation parties can be tiring. A few ways to get back in shape.

The closing party is rarely relaxing for the body. Preparing meals, seeing a lot of people, staying up late can be tiring. Similarly, party dinners and lunches are not known to be the lightest and can feel like you’ve “eaten too much”. A few ways to get back in shape.

• Do not skip meals

After consuming large meals, one may be tempted to skip some on the following days to “compensate”. But according to American dietitian Miranda Galati, “ignoring hunger is not sustainable and will only make your food cravings worse and increase your desire to binge.” On her blog, she therefore simply advises to resume a normal eating routine as soon as possible.

• Balanced meals and vitamin D

During these meals, however, it is better to choose “a healthy diet, rich in protein, vegetables, salads and fruit”, recommends The Smart Clinics, a British chain of private medical centers, on its site. This doesn’t mean you have to completely cut out fatty or sugary foods. Miranda Galati thus recommends “continue to eat in moderation, as you did before the holiday”.

“If you deprive yourself to avoid excess, you risk ending up with a box of cookies at the end of the week,” she explains.

Smart Clinics also recommends staying well hydrated and increasing your vitamin D intake, which depends on sun exposure and diet. Vitamin D “plays an essential role in the quality of bone and muscle tissue as well as in strengthening our immune system”, notes the French national health security agency, ANSES, on its website.

According to ANSES, fatty fish (sardines, salmon, herring, etc.), certain mushrooms (chanterelles, porcini mushrooms, morels), dark chocolate and even egg yolk are rich in vitamin D.

• A “pretox” before the New Year?

A few days before December 31st, one may be tempted to perform a “pretox”. This beauty and wellness trend consists of “preparing” your body for excess by eating less fat or sugar before an important meal. But for Corentin Lacroix, general practitioner and author of The WhyDoc YouTube channelit doesn’t help much: “A good diet plays out in the long term, it’s a matter of weeks or even months. you have to eat in a balanced way,” he explained last week to BFMTV.com.

In addition, the human body has an “integrated detoxification system,” says dietician Miranda Galati.

“If you have a functioning liver, digestive tract, kidneys and lungs in good health, your body can filter out toxins and recover from occasional excesses without difficulty,” she points out on her website.

She therefore advises to forget about juice cleanses and extreme dietary changes, which can especially pose risks for nutrient deficiencies.

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